Category Archives: Facebook

Facebook Messenger Begins Testing For Business Ads

Facebook is well known for keeping in touch with family and friends and for sharing funny videos. The test to integrate ads into Facebook’s Messenger has begun. The company has said that it will launch its characteristics as a small test in Thailand and Australia, which will for the first time allow businesses to have their ads placed on the Messenger home screen. This style of advertising entails a large thumbnail image followed by a text and a link of the same. These ads will appear below recent conversations.

 

The link will be able to direct users on taking different actions like clicking to learn more about the service or the business in question. This action is similar to the way that Facebook business pages today can directs users to start a chat.

 

Currently, the ads sit on a huge space on the home screen, which is below your favorites and up above the section that shows which friends are online. This feature about the Messenger makes it less user-friendly since you will have to scroll way past the large ads which you may not be interested in.

 

Facebook has, however, promised that the ads will not appear in conversations not unless the user clicks on the ad itself or chooses to start a chat with the brand being advertised. This will make it more convenient for its users.

 

Generally, businesses have been waiting for this moment for a long time when they can use the Messenger platform to reach to their customers and increase their sales easily, gain brand awareness and increase interaction with customers. It is clearly an exciting feature for them as it will lead to growth for their respective businesses.

Be A Good Social Media Listener

Social media is about more than just musing on the day’s events or staying in touch with friends and family. Social media is also about marketing. Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms open portals for effectively engaging with audiences who could turn out to be consumers.

 

Business-minded people are known for their ability to think things through. Yet, many entrepreneurs simply create a presence on social media that never really maximizes its potential. Posting material online creates a number of interactive advertisements. Presence does not automatically equate with impact. People looking over the content on a social media page might not really be motivated to react. A disconnect between promotional material and consumer won’t set the stage for success. Social listening, however, just might.

 

Social listening refers to reading what people are writing and posting on a social media page. The insights delivered by what people reveal in posts are worth a lot. Those running social media sites become far too focused on their own work they never review the responses being given. Even if they do review what others are saying, they do not fully intake the commentary. Such an oversight would be a disastrous result for any business.

 

Businesses will invest quite a bit of money into producing generic surveys and questionnaires. The value of these market research tools is well-established. Even though social media commentary provides much more insight into the consumer’s mind, the commentary is not always thoroughly reviewed.

 

When customers are speaking, listen. They have much to tell.

 

Facebook Moves Toward Longer Video Offerings

Facebook is looking to reward video content creators by crediting them for every view that lasts for a minimum of three seconds. This is likely another shift in Facebook’s approach to making itself a valid video platform. Between the reward system and how Facebook’s default state is to automatically play video, publishers made videos with a focus toward grabbing viewership right out of the gates. As a consequence of that approach, many publishers have noticed abysmal completion rates.

 

While Facebook is making changes to how its video content classifies “views,” the social media juggernaut is also modifying its News Feed to prioritize lengthier videos in order to prolong viewer retention and bolster promotion. This shift is just one tweak in Facebook’s focus shift to compete with other video streaming outlets like YouTube and even television.

 

Facebook also plans to play around with their courtship of long-form content by placing mid-roll advertisements within videos that are 90 seconds or more in length. This could easily serve as a message to advertisers that money will come from keeping eyeballs on lengthier clips.

 

In a public comment, Facebook took a stance that any video that can maintain viewership through to completion or near-completion is a compelling video. It added that while longer videos takes up more time, they will be making the change to no longer “penalize” longer videos. It ended the remarks by hinting that lengthier videos would be more likely to receive a greater degree of distribution and proliferation among users.

 

Facebook Has Launched Workplace, a Private Social Network for Enterprises

Facebook has recently launched Workplace, a private social network for businesses. Contrary to the conventional reasons for using Facebook at work (distractions), Workplace is different—it aims to provide employees with a platform to professionally chat with their colleagues in a bid to get work done.

 

Unlike the normal version of Facebook, the platform isn’t connected to users’ existing accounts and is ads-free. Instead, organizations sign up and pay a monthly fee, which is based on the number of its users. It is free for educational institutions and non-profit organizations.

 

New Corporate Features

 

Besides the normal features found in the regular version of Facebook such as groups chats, video calls, news feeds, and live video among others, Workplace has a few new corporate extras such as single sign-on, dashboard analytics, better IT integration, and separate Work Chat app for Android and iOS to enable employees keep in touch when they are out of office.

 

New Offers

 

Workplace is entering a market where a number of players—Yammer, Slack, Chatter, Jive and Hipchat among others—have picked up remarkable tractions. Nonetheless, the platform is hoping to woo people with a plethora of new twists.

 

To begin with, Facebook has thrown most of the pricing models used by its competitors out of the window and plans to follow its own book of metrics. For 1-1,000 active users, the platform will charge $3 per user monthly; for 1,001-10,000, the cost declines to $2 per user; and even less for more than 10,000 monthly active users. Additionally, Facebook will be more accountable for its service. It will only charge for active users and how engaging it manages to make the service.

 

For now Facebook has managed to send a clear message to the market: It is still the leading platform for billions of users to connect to one another in the digital sphere, and is now aggressively entering the corporate world.

 

 

Facebook’s Drone Endeavor Falters

Facebook is a company that took a simple concept — social media — and turned the form of online communications into a global phenomenon. Facebook achieved its tremendous levels of success by constantly innovating and coming up with new innovations. Recent decisions to explore the presentation of original programming via online streaming content show the company’s talent base is always hard at work. Not all the work yields success though. Facebook’s attempts at developing an “internet drone” have proven, well, disastrous.

 

Facebook attempted to make history with the Aquila drone, a massive drone powered by solar energy. The drone truly was massive as it was the size of a plane. The grand visions of those hoping to make history with the drone entered a rather undesirable history book. The Aquila drone is listed among many great corporate research and development failures. The drone famously crashed during a ballyhooed test run. Confidence in the drone was shattered. This is to say nothing of the bad publicity that followed.

 

Facebook’s drone was intended to be highly inspiring. The solar energy powered drone truly embodied “the future is now” sentiment so many find emotionally uplifting. Unfortunately, as far as this drone is concerned, the future is still a long ways away.

 

No guarantees exist when developing something completely new and radical. A lot of trial and error is involved. Failures, costly ones, do occur. The Aquila drone may still fly once again. The date in which this occurs has to wait.

 

A huge drawback to the flop of the Aquila for Facebook is the company loses the publicity and added branding benefits another successful venture yields. Facebook was denied its glory with the drone project. The company is going to move on and come up with new plans. Hits and misses are both expected.

 

Facebook Attempts to Deal With Algorithmic Censorship and Fake News

In 2016, one of the most iconic works of photojournalism in history was inexplicably censored by Facebook. The reaction by news media outlets to this act of censorship was swift; however, the blame placed on an algorithm gone wild was not fully accurate.

 

The photo in question was taken at the height of the Vietnam War in 1972. The harrowing image depicts a group of frightened children, including a naked 9-year old girl, fleeing a napalm attack while United States soldiers follow in the background.

 

Facebook would later apologize for the incident, but the discussion on algorithmic censorship had gone viral by that time. The Vietnam photo incident brought up interesting discussion about Facebook’s role as a massive media channel and its rule by algorithms. It is easy to blame software routines, but it is also easy to forget that human input and executive decisions are coded into the Facebook algorithm.

 

In addition to the above, there’s another issue that Facebook has been left to deal with: the fake news stories that some analysts believe are part of a shadowy network of propagandists. These bogus stories are also believed to have played a part in the surprise 2016 election of Donald Trump as President of the United States.

 

On January 12, 2017, a Syrian migrant targeted by fake news decided to fight back by filing a lawsuit against Facebook. In 2016, when German Prime Minister Angela Merkel visited a migrant shelter in Berlin, Anas Modamani was inspired to take a selfie. That digital image would later be used by fake news authors to smear Modamani and to make him appear to be connected to terrorist attacks in Brussels.

 

Fake news stories have also linked Modamani to other attacks inspired by hate and terror. Since the stories were widely distributed across Facebook, Modamani has chosen to file a defamation lawsuit against the social media network. Facebook plans to vigorously fight this claim.

Facebook Has Launched Workplace, a Private Social Network for Enterprises

Facebook has recently launched Workplace, a private social network for businesses. Contrary to the conventional reasons for using Facebook at work (distractions), Workplace is different—it aims to provide employees with a platform to professionally chat with their colleagues in a bid to get work done.

 

Unlike the normal version of Facebook, the platform isn’t connected to users’ existing accounts and is ads-free. Instead, organizations sign up and pay a monthly fee, which is based on the number of its users. It is free for educational institutions and non-profit organizations.

 

New Corporate Features

 

Besides the normal features found in the regular version of Facebook such as groups chats, video calls, news feeds, and live video among others, Workplace has a few new corporate extras such as single sign-on, dashboard analytics, better IT integration, and separate Work Chat app for Android and iOS to enable employees keep in touch when they are out of office.

 

New Offers

 

Workplace is entering a market where a number of players—Yammer, Slack, Chatter, Jive and Hipchat among others—have picked up remarkable tractions. Nonetheless, the platform is hoping to woo people with a plethora of new twists.

 

To begin with, Facebook has thrown most of the pricing models used by its competitors out of the window and plans to follow its own book of metrics. For 1-1,000 active users, the platform will charge $3 per user monthly; for 1,001-10,000, the cost declines to $2 per user; and even less for more than 10,000 monthly active users. Additionally, Facebook will be more accountable for its service. It will only charge for active users and how engaging it manages to make the service.

 

For now Facebook has managed to send a clear message to the market: It is still the leading platform for billions of users to connect to one another in the digital sphere, and is now aggressively entering the corporate world.

 

 

Some Facebook Employees Disagree With The Company’s Stance On Fake News Stories

There has been a lot of news coverage lately concerning the issue of fake news stories being posted on social media websites. A few minutes ago, I read an article that is about a group of Facebook employees who are challenging the stance taken on the issue by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

 

This article tells how an anonymous group of Facebook employees have formed a task force to comprehensively look at the issue. While Mr. Zuckerberg disputes that fake news stories on the online platform affected the recent presidential election, this group of employees disagrees.

 

The task force, that is said to include dozens of employees, is meeting in secret for now, but hopes to be able to speak freely and formalize its meetings in the future.

 

According to this article, more than 150 million American citizens utilize social media websites. Supposedly, many people now receive much of their news information from these websites, in place of more traditional sources.

 

A recent study by a leading research organization found that false or misleading information had been published on both left-wing and right-wing-oriented social media pages prior to the election. The study also revealed that almost twice as much false information was published on right-wing pages.

 

One thing that I don’t understand, however, is the fact that millions of Americans now rely on a social media website for receiving news information.

 

Now I can’t help but wonder if fake news stories have been circulated during elections for decades.

 

Teens and Social Media

In this day and age, connection between people isn’t always physical or in person. In many ways, connection has become more about “likes” and “comments” than about making actual time for each other.

 

There are many camps of thought on this, but certainly one area of thinking says that all of this is caused by our dependence on one particular aspect of technology, and that is social media.

 

Social media runs many individuals’ lives. In fact, it not only runs many older adults’ lives, but it also runs teens’ lives. In this way, we are referring to how addicted many teens are to social media platforms.

 

Using Social Media as a Teen

 

Some research has been done on how addicted teens are to social media, and the outcome hasn’t been too good. In fact, a great number of teenagers have been found to experience depression and loneliness as a direct result of using social media on a regular basis.

 

How to Handle a Teen Who Is Addicted to Social Media

 

If you have a teen who uses social media, take some important steps to ensure their safety and wellbeing. First, monitor what they do on social media. As a parent, it’s your right and duty. Second, limit the amount of time that they can use social media on a daily basis. In addition and as a last resort if kids are resisting stopping social media after a certain amount of time, keep computers and phones out of the bedroom.

 

Order Food Right From Your Facebook!

Just when you think Facebook can’t come out with any new features, they surprise us all. Their newest feature involves food. People can now have a quick and easy way to order food right from their Facebook. This is a genius idea because so many people are already on Facebook anyway.

 

According to Reddit, people in forty cities are able to utilize this feature. All they have to do is browse Facebook pages of restaurants that they like. The new feature allows restaurants to show their menus and people can order directly from their page. This is great for businesses for a variety of reasons. For one, it will lead to more views and likes on their page. It will also lead to more revenue because existing fans will start ordering food right from the page! They might not even realize they’re hungry but once they see the ease of ordering, they’ll do it.

 

This is a great partnership between Facebook and local businesses. After this, it’s interesting to see what Facebook will come out with next. Perhaps clothing and retail pages will follow suit and people can order right from their pages. Either way, this is truly a great idea. It’s something that will generate a lot of revenue and help people out who want to quickly order food. If successful, it’s likely that other cities will implement this as well. Who knows, maybe this will become the way of the future.