Monthly Archives: February 2017

New Trends in Social Media Use by Business Entities

The year 2016 was a momentous period for social media in relation to business marketing and promotion. Everything suggests that 2017 will be an even bigger year for the intersection of social media and business marketing, particularly because of the 10-year anniversary of Facebook Pages.

 

There was a time when business marketing was not allowed on Facebook. Until 2007, only individual profiles were allowed, and the promotion of business activities by individuals was looked down upon. Once Facebook announced that companies were allowed to create profiles, more than 100,000 brands quickly signed up on the first day.

 

Some of the social media trends developing in 2017 include proposals to no longer embrace this communications channel; such was the call by Geoff Lewis of the Founder Fund, a firm dedicated to funding major digital media enterprises. Lewis believes that social media platform lend themselves to the creation of “scripted reality,” which may have contributed to the election of New York billionaire Donald Trump as President of the United States.

 

A lot has changed for the social media and business marketing sphere since 2007. Years ago, promoting brands on social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter was extremely effective; the same cannot be said in 2017 due to the higher levels of competition.

 

One trend that is certain to develop in 2017 is that companies will no longer use social media channels exclusively to drive traffic to their websites. The idea is to deliver tangible messages. For example, a fashion boutique can offer discounts solely on Twitter or Facebook without advertising on its physical store or on its website.

 

Another trend for 2017 with relation to social media will be mobile advertising. It is time for business owners to invest in sponsored updates and other strategies that allow them to reach beyond their existing followers.

 

 

Karl Heideck Kicks Into High Gear! Visions From A Mind That Matters!

Inside the mind of Karl HeideckAchieving his Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in English Language and Literature/Letters back in 2003 before going on to Temple University – James E. Beasley School of Law from 2006 till 2009 when he achieved his J.D., Law and was accomplished in appearing in making the Dean’s List, Karl Heideck has always been destined for greatness.

In January of 2010, Heideck stepped up to Conrad O’Brien where he became an associate for less than a year, before deciding to make a change and pursue a job at Pepper Hamilton LLP where he soon made a career out of being their Project Attorney. He spent three years and seven months working for the company Pepper Hamilton LLP before changing again to find his place as part of the team at Hire Counsel where he currently works as their Contract Attorney at Grant & Eisenhower in Pennsylvania.

In his current position, Karl Heideck makes a living out of helping along progress against complex security fraud as well as banking litigation through his research and review of discovery materials. He makes it his business to consider acquisitions, liquidity positions, transactions, and risk management in response to the 2008 banking crisis. Karl Heideck is a man of great tact and exceptional valor in the business world and it shows through in everything he does in his ever growing career.

Karl Heideck is not only a phenomenal business mind with outstanding expertise in his area, but he is also going strong as a leading member in both heart and spirit for the community. Taking part in e-Legal, Law Jobs Network – #1 Legal Careers Group, Afro-IP African Intellectual Property, and Temple Rome Alumni, Heideck is taking great strides in the business world to help better society as a whole to the best of his ability.

See: http://www.martindale.com/Karl-Heideck/168775858-lawyer.htm

New Changes For Edited Facebook Posts

If you’re the type of person who creates lots of posts on Facebook, a recent change in the website’s editing process may be important to you. A recent online article that I just finished reading tells how Facebook will no longer be clearly identifying edited posts.

 

Up until now, if you posted something on Facebook, then realized after the post was up that you wanted to change it, a little “Edited” label would appear next to the post after you made changes.

 

With the new editing policy, you can make changes to something you’ve posted, but the “Edited” label is not openly displayed for the world to see.

 

Even though edited posts may no longer be openly labeled as such, it is still possible for other Facebook users to know if you edited a post.

 

All you have to do now to see if a Facebook post has been edited, is click-on the little drop-down menu that is situated at the upper right side of the post. If a post has been edited, one of the options in the drop-down menu will be “View edit history”.

 

When I first saw this article, I didn’t really think there was much significance to this editing change. The author of the article, however, brings up the issue of transparency in today’s world.

 

It is mentioned how government officials, celebrities, and brands all post on Facebook. The author makes the point that just allowing people to alter previously posted information in today’s world can raise some eyebrows. The article also mentions how edited comments on posts are not affected by the editing change.

Timehop CEO Replaced By Its Lead Designer

Social media application Timehop has recently undergone a major shake-up in its corporate structure. For the uninitiated, Timehop is a reminder service for content people have posted to various social media outlets. Jon Wegener, co-founder and CEO of the company, has descended from the corporate position in order for the application’s lead designer to take over. This shake-up also has Rick Webb, an early investor with the company, ascending to COO. Wegener commented that these changes reflect a long-term plan to step away from his corporate role, rather than any calculated measure to jump ship.

 

Timehop was established back in 2011 in an extension of its founders’ coding during a Foursquare hacking event. After working at Techstars for a while, the two decided to turn their hack into a business after discovering how well it was received. After integrating Facebook and Instagram, Timehop became a social media reality. The app has missions of users that have turned to it as an alternative to Snapchat’s fleeting offerings.

 

In March of 2015, right as Timehop had reached 12 million downloads and a daily userbase half as large, Facebook installed its own version of the app via the “On This Day.” Furthermore, Timehop’s mobile userbase has continued to dwindle at a steady pace, reflecting a nearly-40 percent drop between the fourth quarters of 2015 and 2016. This seems to indicate that Timehop had been more reliant on loyalty and engagement than other apps, with the decline endemic of new users having bad experiences and leading to a ripple effect of disuse and abandonment.

 

With its new executive team in place, Timehop is working to raise profitability at a slow but sure pace. One year after Facebook’s introduction of On This Day, it maintained 60 million daily users and more than 150 million subscribers.

 

Facebook’s Drone Endeavor Falters

Facebook is a company that took a simple concept — social media — and turned the form of online communications into a global phenomenon. Facebook achieved its tremendous levels of success by constantly innovating and coming up with new innovations. Recent decisions to explore the presentation of original programming via online streaming content show the company’s talent base is always hard at work. Not all the work yields success though. Facebook’s attempts at developing an “internet drone” have proven, well, disastrous.

 

Facebook attempted to make history with the Aquila drone, a massive drone powered by solar energy. The drone truly was massive as it was the size of a plane. The grand visions of those hoping to make history with the drone entered a rather undesirable history book. The Aquila drone is listed among many great corporate research and development failures. The drone famously crashed during a ballyhooed test run. Confidence in the drone was shattered. This is to say nothing of the bad publicity that followed.

 

Facebook’s drone was intended to be highly inspiring. The solar energy powered drone truly embodied “the future is now” sentiment so many find emotionally uplifting. Unfortunately, as far as this drone is concerned, the future is still a long ways away.

 

No guarantees exist when developing something completely new and radical. A lot of trial and error is involved. Failures, costly ones, do occur. The Aquila drone may still fly once again. The date in which this occurs has to wait.

 

A huge drawback to the flop of the Aquila for Facebook is the company loses the publicity and added branding benefits another successful venture yields. Facebook was denied its glory with the drone project. The company is going to move on and come up with new plans. Hits and misses are both expected.

 

Facebook Attempts to Deal With Algorithmic Censorship and Fake News

In 2016, one of the most iconic works of photojournalism in history was inexplicably censored by Facebook. The reaction by news media outlets to this act of censorship was swift; however, the blame placed on an algorithm gone wild was not fully accurate.

 

The photo in question was taken at the height of the Vietnam War in 1972. The harrowing image depicts a group of frightened children, including a naked 9-year old girl, fleeing a napalm attack while United States soldiers follow in the background.

 

Facebook would later apologize for the incident, but the discussion on algorithmic censorship had gone viral by that time. The Vietnam photo incident brought up interesting discussion about Facebook’s role as a massive media channel and its rule by algorithms. It is easy to blame software routines, but it is also easy to forget that human input and executive decisions are coded into the Facebook algorithm.

 

In addition to the above, there’s another issue that Facebook has been left to deal with: the fake news stories that some analysts believe are part of a shadowy network of propagandists. These bogus stories are also believed to have played a part in the surprise 2016 election of Donald Trump as President of the United States.

 

On January 12, 2017, a Syrian migrant targeted by fake news decided to fight back by filing a lawsuit against Facebook. In 2016, when German Prime Minister Angela Merkel visited a migrant shelter in Berlin, Anas Modamani was inspired to take a selfie. That digital image would later be used by fake news authors to smear Modamani and to make him appear to be connected to terrorist attacks in Brussels.

 

Fake news stories have also linked Modamani to other attacks inspired by hate and terror. Since the stories were widely distributed across Facebook, Modamani has chosen to file a defamation lawsuit against the social media network. Facebook plans to vigorously fight this claim.

Is Facebook Ad Traffic Really Useless?

Reports about Facebook and Google advertising traffic do not exactly pain a nice picture. Claims indicate roughly 90% of the traffic associated with the ads are “useless“. Facebook and Google are doubtfully thrilled with such a report. The report is discouraging. No, business won’t outright collapse just because a news report about the uselessness of the ads is published. Some viewers of the ads will be turned off though. Articles of this nature may go viral. In time, articles like these can collective impact a significant number of perceptions. Poor perception on ads could have an undesirable effect. Even a slight decrease in revenue is something giants like Facebook and Google hope to avoid.

 

The notion of “90% useless traffic” is a bit misunderstood. Facebook ads are designed to run throughout the platform of the social media network and draw the eyes of members interested in what appears on the ad. Ads of this nature are rely on conversion rates. Conversions refer to serious parties that actually click on the ads. After clicking on the ads, they do what the advertisers wants. Buying a product is one thing. Joining a Facebook group is another. Advertisers all have different goals.

 

10% of valuable traffic is a fairly good conversion rate. Expecting half of the advertising traffic to do what the advertiser wants would be unrealistic. Would half the people watching every Super Bowl advertisement make a purchase?

 

Advertisements cast a proverbial wide net. Not everyone caught in the net responds. The goal is to procure the highest and more feasible volume of serious click-throughs. Those buying ads on Facebook or Google must maintain realistic expectations. Without a proper outlook on what to expect with the ads, disappointment is unavoidable. From this perspective, 10% of valuable traffic is not so bad.

 

Social Media Succeeds in Providing a Better Advertising Option to the Small-Scale Entrepreneurs

There has been uproar on the use of social media among the young millennial and the businesspersons. Most of the youths use social media for entertainment while entrepreneurs use it to promote their businesses. The small-scale entrepreneurs who may not have enough capital for advertising and marketing turn to social media as an alternative. Most of them attest to great success in their business by using different platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Google +, and Pinterest, among others.

 

 

Use of social media in business

 

 

Internet Retailer’s Social Media 500 gave a report showing that the top 500 social media retailers earned $3.3 million in 2014. In addition to that, the social media driven retails and the traffic sales have registered higher sales compared to other online channels. Entrepreneurs using social media in their business may customize their ads to contain the “buy” button on the posts. The other way of generating money using the social media includes directing traffic to their websites and applications through advertising. Approximately 64% of the small business owners rely on social media for their business advice.

 

 

Social Media and Marketing

 

 

Small business owners with no experience and capital in business turn to social media for advertising. The variation in the use of the social media depends on one’s budget, the target audience, and the company’s goal. Instagram is ideal for posting the high-quality photos while Twitter works well with multiple posts daily. Artistic and women products perform best on Pinterest while Linked In targets very formal clients or businesses. An entrepreneur intending to spend some capital on paid ads would consider using Facebook.

 

 

YouTube Pays $1billion to the music industry

 

 

According to a December post on Business Insider, YouTube has paid the music industry more than $1 billion in the past one financial year. The income paid out covers the advertising alone without the inclusion of revenue generated from subscriptions. YouTube intends to increase the number of subscriptions as a way of helping the digital companies increase their average revenue per year. The digital media use the subscriptions to provide an ad-free premium experience to the users and increase their income every year.

 

 

 

Social Media Recruiting: What Companies Are Doing To Avoid Legal Pitfalls

There is no doubt that social media is transforming the way people do business—and the trend extends beyond marketing. A number of companies are turning to social media to assist with their hiring processes. In fact, according to the Society for Human Resource Management’s survey, 84% of organizations are currently using social media to screen candidates.

 

However, there are legal risks involved in the process: for instance, a simple Facebook photo can reveal certain protected characteristics such as race, gender, disability, and age that employers are not allowed to consider when recruiting.

 

Even so, many recruiters have devised a lot of ways to avoid potential legal pitfalls when recruiting via social media, including:

 

Expanding their applicants pool

 

Over 80% of companies are using social media to recruit passive job candidates—who aren’t currently looking for jobs—and to screen candidates who are being interviewed for certain positions. They believe that social media provide a good platform to reach highly qualified candidates that can sometimes be daunting to find through conventional recruiting channels.

 

Treating social media like other recruitment tools

 

Many recruiters are not turning to social media as the only recruitment tool. They are also integrating traditional channels such as career fairs and job boards so as not to block candidates who don’t use social media or who lack strong social media presence.

 

On the whole, the message is delivered; while it isn’t fair to use social media to make employment decisions, employers continue to use it as an extension to candidates’ resume and a as conversation starter to give them a deeper understanding of the potential candidates.

Facebook Has Launched Workplace, a Private Social Network for Enterprises

Facebook has recently launched Workplace, a private social network for businesses. Contrary to the conventional reasons for using Facebook at work (distractions), Workplace is different—it aims to provide employees with a platform to professionally chat with their colleagues in a bid to get work done.

 

Unlike the normal version of Facebook, the platform isn’t connected to users’ existing accounts and is ads-free. Instead, organizations sign up and pay a monthly fee, which is based on the number of its users. It is free for educational institutions and non-profit organizations.

 

New Corporate Features

 

Besides the normal features found in the regular version of Facebook such as groups chats, video calls, news feeds, and live video among others, Workplace has a few new corporate extras such as single sign-on, dashboard analytics, better IT integration, and separate Work Chat app for Android and iOS to enable employees keep in touch when they are out of office.

 

New Offers

 

Workplace is entering a market where a number of players—Yammer, Slack, Chatter, Jive and Hipchat among others—have picked up remarkable tractions. Nonetheless, the platform is hoping to woo people with a plethora of new twists.

 

To begin with, Facebook has thrown most of the pricing models used by its competitors out of the window and plans to follow its own book of metrics. For 1-1,000 active users, the platform will charge $3 per user monthly; for 1,001-10,000, the cost declines to $2 per user; and even less for more than 10,000 monthly active users. Additionally, Facebook will be more accountable for its service. It will only charge for active users and how engaging it manages to make the service.

 

For now Facebook has managed to send a clear message to the market: It is still the leading platform for billions of users to connect to one another in the digital sphere, and is now aggressively entering the corporate world.